ARTHUR’S SEAT

Lynne Kiesling

Please join me in welcoming my dear old (and yes, it’s depressing to say that!) friend Adam to the Internet at Arthur’s Seat. Arthur’s Seat is one of the most dramatic geologic features of Edinburgh, and thus forms the theme for Adam’s commentary from Scotland, on Scotland and beyond. He writes beautifully, and is sure to be a valuable addition to your daily reads.

Given his recent sojourn here in the US I expect to hear much about his impressions of US elections over the next few days.

ARTHUR’S SEAT

Lynne Kiesling

Please join me in welcoming my dear old (and yes, it’s depressing to say that!) friend Adam to the Internet at Arthur’s Seat. Arthur’s Seat is one of the most dramatic geologic features of Edinburgh, and thus forms the theme for Adam’s commentary from Scotland, on Scotland and beyond. He writes beautifully, and is sure to be a valuable addition to your daily reads.

Given his recent sojourn here in the US I expect to hear much about his impressions of US elections over the next few days.

FIRST STEEL, NOW CLOTHING?

Lynne Kiesling

This can’t be good. The Bush administration has agreed to consider import limitations on cotton trousers and shorts from China, according to this New York Times article from Saturday (registration required).

American manufacturers and the labor union representing textile workers have been pressing for help in advance of the lifting of all trade quotas on textiles and apparel on Jan. 1, 2005, allowing for the free flow of goods around the globe.

Last month, the manufacturers’ coalition presented the petition to the administration, knowing that the deadline would fall just before voting in the tight presidential election.

Members of the World Trade Organization agreed to the Jan. 1 deadline a decade ago but as the date nears, manufacturers in the United States and other textile-producing countries have been scrambling to protect their industries from competition from China.

How calculated is this? Are potential swing votes from textile workers sufficient to outweigh potential swing votes in the opposite direction from textile importers and free-trade supporters, many of whom are already extremely skeptical of the Bush administration?

BACK IN THE SADDLE, KINDA

Lynne Kiesling

Six straight weeks of either conference or houseguests … and this weekend involved both! I came home Friday from a very cool conference on ethics and changing energy markets to my visiting in-laws. It’s a nice autumnal weekend here in Chicago, so we are having fun; today will be carving the jack-o-lantern for the trick-or-treat activities, and also taking our kayaks out and storing them for the season. That’s always a bit depressing, but at least this year we have a garage in which to store them and don’t have to impose on the generosity and kindness of our friends!

So the rest of the fall and early winter are not going to be quite so insane, I hope … and I know Mike’s been busy too. I’ve also been a little self-censoring because I’ve been chewing on some deep conceptual issues having to do with regulation of network industries, incumbency, status quo bias, etc. … I’m beginning to think that they are ready for the light of day, so will try to frame them and put them out here for general discussion and refinement over the next couple of weeks.

This should mean more fresh content here, soon. Gotta deal with kayaks and pumpkins today, though!

BACK IN THE SADDLE, KINDA

Lynne Kiesling

Six straight weeks of either conference or houseguests … and this weekend involved both! I came home Friday from a very cool conference on ethics and changing energy markets to my visiting in-laws. It’s a nice autumnal weekend here in Chicago, so we are having fun; today will be carving the jack-o-lantern for the trick-or-treat activities, and also taking our kayaks out and storing them for the season. That’s always a bit depressing, but at least this year we have a garage in which to store them and don’t have to impose on the generosity and kindness of our friends!

So the rest of the fall and early winter are not going to be quite so insane, I hope … and I know Mike’s been busy too. I’ve also been a little self-censoring because I’ve been chewing on some deep conceptual issues having to do with regulation of network industries, incumbency, status quo bias, etc. … I’m beginning to think that they are ready for the light of day, so will try to frame them and put them out here for general discussion and refinement over the next couple of weeks.

This should mean more fresh content here, soon. Gotta deal with kayaks and pumpkins today, though!