New group formed to promote research in U.S. electric power markets

Michael Giberson

Last week saw announcement of the Electric Markets Research Foundation. The group plans “to fund unbiased research that will examine the track records of centralized electricity markets and traditionally regulated markets in providing affordable and reliable supplies of power as well as meeting clean energy, transmission and environmental needs.” The news release continues:

“There is a dearth of research available on this market-versus-regulation debate and little analysis has been conducted on this 50-state experiment. The Electric Markets Research Foundation intends to address this by supporting research by academics and industry experts on major electric market issues, including customer rates, reliability and service,” said Bruce S. Edelston, the foundation’s president and the driving force behind the research effort.

The governance group looks a little heavy on DC-oriented policy folks, except for Albert Danielsen, a long-time professor of economics at the University of Georgia and executive director of the Bonbright Center for Public Utilities at U. of G. I guess we’ll have to count on Danielsen to keep an eye on the lobbyists.

I’m looking forward to their efforts.

About these ads

One thought on “New group formed to promote research in U.S. electric power markets

  1. Planning for the future in the electric power industry is not advisable. What’s advisable it to reduce the systemic delays for customers to respond in vibrant distributed retail markets. In a world with deep uncertainties… “to fund unbiased research that will examine the track records of centralized electricity markets and traditionally regulated markets in providing affordable and reliable supplies of power as well as meeting clean energy, transmission and environmental needs,” is now a waist of time and money, based on the article Competitive electric retail revolution, that starts as follows:

    There were two major limitations to competitive electric retail markets, one was conceptual, the other political. We didn’t really understand electric retail markets. As a result, after the California debacle, new retail competition development was practically stopped by political decision making all over the world… to read the whole hit the link http://bit.ly/GMH764

Comments are closed.