Google’s Ipo

So, Google’s IPO looks interesting. The main WSJ article (subscription required) on the IPO highlights two things of interest. First: the distribution of the shares via a uniform price Dutch auction. They’re going to have investors submit bids, where the bid includes the number of shares desired and the price. Aggregating all bid curves creates … More Google’s IpoMore Google’s Ipo

These Guys Are Funny

I like wine guys with a sense of humor, particularly when their name is a play on one of my favorite 80s bands. Speaking of the 80s, today at a meeting about Illinois electricity restructuring I was talking to one of the leaders of the movement toward market-oriented policy in Illinois that started back in … More These Guys Are FunnyMore These Guys Are Funny

Fishing And Aquaculture Technology

This article from the May issue of Wired is a fascinating look at technological innovation in aquaculture and open-sea fish farming. The article has a lot of detail on problems of overfishing and how innovation (not bureaucracy) is addressing the problem in the face of ever-increasing human demands for animal protein. … More Fishing And Aquaculture Technology

“Salting”, Or Is That “Ironing”, The Oceans

More ocean stuff, this time to do with CO2 … last week Nature published an article on results from a study that put iron-rich fertilizer in the ocean near Antarctica. A team of oceanographers from Californian marine research institutes dropped 1.7 tonnes of iron sulphate in the sea as part of the Southern Ocean Iron … More “Salting”, Or Is That “Ironing”, The OceansMore “Salting”, Or Is That “Ironing”, The Oceans

Fisheries In The News

There’s been a lot of discussion and analysis lately of fisheries and fishery policy. In many ways fisheries represent the quintessential “tragedy of the commons” (or what I prefer to call “tragedy of open access”) because treating fish populations as an open access resource has led to overfishing of many species as human populations have … More Fisheries In The NewsMore Fisheries In The News

Revealed Preference: Kiesling Chicago, Bainbridge La

So it looks like Stephen Bainbridge and I crossed in the air over Colorado somewhere. Two things: 1. Honey, why ya still flying United? 2. He says he couldn’t live here because he’d miss the LA sun. Every time I spend a weekend in LA I am glad to get home to Chicago. In addition … More Revealed Preference: Kiesling Chicago, Bainbridge LaMore Revealed Preference: Kiesling Chicago, Bainbridge La

Carnival Of The Capitalists 26 April

COTC this week is up and running at Venturpreneur. Have fun! … More Carnival Of The Capitalists 26 April

A Great Website On The Simon/Erlich Bet

Here’s a great source for the next time you run into an apocalyptic, Doomsday-predicting naysayer: a detailed summary of the famous bet between Julian Simon and Paul Erlich. Punch line: prices reflect scarcity. Human creativity and ingeneuity, expressed through technological change, can push back the bounds of scarcity, even in resources that are technically nonrenewable. … More A Great Website On The Simon/Erlich BetMore A Great Website On The Simon/Erlich Bet

Virginia Postrel On Choice, Not Lowest Price

By now everyone’s read Virginia’s Economic Scene column from Thursday, but I wanted to chime in with my two cents because her argument, and Erik Brynjolfsson et. al.’s research on online commerce, are at the core of my arguments for market-based retail choice in electricity. Online shoppers are not just buying the same stuff for … More Virginia Postrel On Choice, Not Lowest PriceMore Virginia Postrel On Choice, Not Lowest Price

Jennifer Zambone On Malaria Prevention

There’s been lots of talk lately about malaria and DDT. As an addition to that thread, I recommend this National Review article by Jennifer Zambone on malaria prevention. Her argument is that investing in malaria prevention in Africa will pay off many times over. … More Jennifer Zambone On Malaria Prevention