WHO’S STIFLING COMPETITION TO KEEP PRICES HIGH IN TELECOM?

Lynne Kiesling According to Larry Lessig in this article from March’s Wired issue, it’s state officials. In writing about municipal WiFi, Lessig argues that [t]he telcos’ argument isn’t much more subtle than that of the simpleton who began this column: Businesses shouldn’t have to compete against their governments. What the market can do, the government … More WHO’S STIFLING COMPETITION TO KEEP PRICES HIGH IN TELECOM?More WHO’S STIFLING COMPETITION TO KEEP PRICES HIGH IN TELECOM?

GUEST POST ON INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE: IAN COOK

Ian Cook [NOTE: Our anti-spam software does not like something in Ian’s comment, so he graciously gave his consent to post this as a guest post — ed.] Unfortunately, I don’t know much about the institutions specifically within the electric power industry, so I imagine this will be of limited help. But, that’s never really … More GUEST POST ON INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE: IAN COOKMore GUEST POST ON INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE: IAN COOK

DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE IV: USE RIGHTS, RULES, AND CHANGE PROCESSES

Lynne Kiesling In my previous post about organic institutional change, I pondered Ostrom’s eight institutional design principles. She applies her analyses to common pool resources (CPRs). Are they also applicable to changing electricity regulation institutions? Obviously I suspect that the answer is “yes” or I wouldn’t be putting us all through this. One of the … More DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE IV: USE RIGHTS, RULES, AND CHANGE PROCESSESMore DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE IV: USE RIGHTS, RULES, AND CHANGE PROCESSES