Recommended Reading: Environmental Economics

Lynne Kiesling I am in Glen Arbor, Michigan, attending a Liberty Fund conference on Charles Darwin. I’ll have a lot to say about it. But for now, I refer you to the plentiful and interesting posts today at Environmental Economics. Coase, Grandfather Mountain, and an energy bill update. … More Recommended Reading: Environmental Economics

Rent Seeking: Is The Energy Bill Really A Farm Bill?

Lynne Kiesling Because that’s what it looks like to me. And to Jim Lucier of Prudential Securities, who took the words right out of my mouth on Tuesday’s Kudlow & Company. In all of the commentary and analysis that I have read, very few people believe that this bill will do anything constructive to remove … More Rent Seeking: Is The Energy Bill Really A Farm Bill?More Rent Seeking: Is The Energy Bill Really A Farm Bill?

More Sports Contracts: Cycling Teams

Lynne Kiesling While we’re on the subject of contracting and incentives in sports … Khazak cyclist Alexandre Vinokourov is leaving team T-Mobile for Spanish team Liberty-Seguros. “Vino” came in fifth in the Tour last week and third in 2003. As contracting and team dynamics go, cycling teams are a fascinating subject for study. Vino is … More More Sports Contracts: Cycling TeamsMore More Sports Contracts: Cycling Teams

New Nhl Rule Proposals: Incentive Effects

Lynne Kiesling For new institutional economists, the NHL is a multi-dimensional laboratory right now. The six-year labor agreement signed last Friday, including team-level salary caps and revenue sharing, has spurred a flurry of contract buyouts. The Yahoo Sports NHL news archive since Saturday has been full of stories of teams buying out contracts of their … More New Nhl Rule Proposals: Incentive EffectsMore New Nhl Rule Proposals: Incentive Effects

Breaking The Nhl Silence-bargaining Errors

Lynne Kiesling Although an avowed long-time hockey fan, I have kept silent on the topic of the NHL lockout and the loss of the 2004-2005 season. Why? Disgust. I thought, and continue to think, that all parties acquitted themselves poorly. The owners and the league made strategic errors in estimating the value of broadcast rights … More Breaking The Nhl Silence-bargaining ErrorsMore Breaking The Nhl Silence-bargaining Errors

Eff’s 15th Anniversary: Celebrate Freedom

Lynne Kiesling This week marks the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s 15th anniversary. EFF is a tireless warrior for preserving and enhancing freedom as communication and information technology evolves. Cory Doctorow has a Boing Boing post discussing EFF’s activities over the past 15 years: This week marks the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s 15th anniversary — a decade and … More Eff’s 15th Anniversary: Celebrate FreedomMore Eff’s 15th Anniversary: Celebrate Freedom

A Musical Interlude

Lynne Kiesling Your Intrepid Economist spent the last two evenings partaking of the musical plenitude of Chicago. Wednesday was a long-overdue evening at our almost-neighborhood hangout the Green Mill to hear Kurt Elling and “the band”, the Laurence Hobgood Trio. We try to go every Wednesday they’re in town, but my life is often too … More A Musical InterludeMore A Musical Interlude

Eminent Domain Threats Suffocate Organic Development

Lynne Kiesling I’ve mentioned before (here and here) that my hometown of Pittsburgh has an abysmal record of using eminent domain to achieve top-down, centralized urban planning goals, with disastrous results. Poor neighborhoods destroyed, a desolate and soulless downtown, and a languishing area downtown around Fifth Ave. and Forbes Ave. that the city has been … More Eminent Domain Threats Suffocate Organic DevelopmentMore Eminent Domain Threats Suffocate Organic Development

Whitman And Wilkinson On Changing Preferences

Lynne Kiesling Glen Whitman’s got a nice post discussing utilitarianism, Coase, Layard, and the implications of Will Wilkinson’s recent evisceration of Layard’s utilitarian interventionist arguments about status and well being. When I first read Will’s post, my initial reaction was “yikes, I hope I never get on Will’s wrong side!” Will cleverly applies Coasian analysis … More Whitman And Wilkinson On Changing PreferencesMore Whitman And Wilkinson On Changing Preferences

Sprawl As A Tax On Spontaneity

Lynne Kiesling In his post inquiring why we organize our kids so much, I like the way Tyler Cowen put his hypothesis 3: Suburban sprawl is a tax on spontaneity. And as more kids get trapped into planned networks, it becomes harder to go it alone. I think there’s some validity to that hypothesis. I … More Sprawl As A Tax On SpontaneityMore Sprawl As A Tax On Spontaneity