Smart grid and renewables interconnection (Part 4 of 5)

Lynne Kiesling One of the reasons why smart grid is generating so much interest right now is its ability to enable the integration of renewable energy into the electric power network, leading to a broader generation portfolio and potentially beneficial carbon implications. Lots of the discussion of smart grid in policy and media (including places … More Smart grid and renewables interconnection (Part 4 of 5)

Solar eclipses and the electric grid: Markets and automation

Yesterday’s solar eclipse across the US amplified a dominant issue in electricity policy discussions over the past couple of years — does increasing use of distributed energy resources like solar photovoltaics make the grid more resilient, or does it lead to imbalance and inadequacy? In California during the eclipse (Financial Times), solar generation dropped compared to … More Solar eclipses and the electric grid: Markets and automation

House Energy and Power Subcommittee takes a look at the Federal Power Act; one small suggestion for reform

As had been announced in June of this year, the Energy and Power subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives is devoting some time to a deep look into the Federal Power Act (FPA). At the time of the June announcement the committee sent a letter to Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) saying: As you know, the … More House Energy and Power Subcommittee takes a look at the Federal Power Act; one small suggestion for reform

The case for allowing negative electricity prices – Benedettini and Stagnaro

Simona Benedettini and Carlo Stagnaro make the case for allowing negative prices in electric power markets in Europe. A few of the larger power markets in Europe allow prices to go negative, but others retain a zero price lower limit. Benedettini and Stagnaro explain both why it is reasonable, economically speaking, to allow electricity prices … More The case for allowing negative electricity prices – Benedettini and Stagnaro

PJM region could handle substantially more renewable generation, study says

PJM Interconnection has been studying, with the help of GE Energy Consulting and other groups, the consequences of adding significantly more wind energy and solar energy to its transmission grid. The “headline result” of a preliminary report, presented to PJM stakeholders recently, is that the system could handle renewable power generation capacity at a 30 … More PJM region could handle substantially more renewable generation, study says

Disruptive innovation and the regulated utility

Over the weekend the New York Times ran a good story about how rooftop solar and regulatory rules allowing net metering are putting pressure on the regulated distribution utility business model: The struggle over the California incentives is only the most recent and visible dust-up as many utilities cling to their established business, and its … More Disruptive innovation and the regulated utility

The Benefits of the proposed Tres Amigas interconnection

Michael Giberson Both of the Tres Amigas filings at FERC (see background) provide summaries of the anticipated benefits of the proposed interconnection between the Eastern, Western, and ERCOT interconnections.  Each of the five kinds of benefits listed below seem plausible to me.  While estimating the size of the benefits would require a lot of hard … More The Benefits of the proposed Tres Amigas interconnection

Tres Amigas project proposes to connect Eastern, Western, and Texas power grids

Michael Giberson A high-profile, high-technology power project is making waves well beyond the small town of Clovis, New Mexico, where it has secured land for development. I’ve been telling my students and anyone else I can induce to listen to me for a few minutes (i.e., mostly just my students) that my new hometown of … More Tres Amigas project proposes to connect Eastern, Western, and Texas power grids

Does the Wall Street Journal employ anyone who understands energy markets? Three rejoinders

Michael Giberson In Grist, Adam Browing asks, “Does the Wall Street Journal employ anyone who understands energy markets?”  Browning’s question and his answer seem just a little off, as I’ll discuss below, but first an excerpt from Browning: Actually, I think they do.  I think Keith Johnson knows quite a bit about energy markets.  Which … More Does the Wall Street Journal employ anyone who understands energy markets? Three rejoinders

Smart grid technology, economics, and policy (Part 1 of 5)

Lynne Kiesling This week I’ll be writing a series of posts about smart grid technology, economics, and policy. The buzz around the idea of smart grid is palpable:  old companies like GE and new companies like Google are changing their business models to incorporate more smart grid activities and products, entrepreneurs are exploring new products … More Smart grid technology, economics, and policy (Part 1 of 5)