Trump and Clinton on energy policy during the second presidential debate

From the transcript posted by PolitiFact, the exchange on energy issues from the October 9 debate between Donald J. Trump and Hillary Clinton: COOPER: We have one more question from Ken Bone about energy policy. Ken? QUESTION: What steps will your energy policy take to meet our energy needs, while at the same time remaining … More Trump and Clinton on energy policy during the second presidential debate

On Trump’s energy policy: Big players are bad news for energy policy

My commentary, “Trump’s policy may undermine pro-growth intentions,” appears in the October 2016 issue of Nature Energy. Here is one of my favorite parts: Trump’s emphasis on energy independence, in North Dakota and elsewhere, has been common among both Republicans and Democrats. President Richard Nixon declared energy independence a priority in an effort to blame the Organization … More On Trump’s energy policy: Big players are bad news for energy policy

My congressman invites me to Submit & Join*

Michael Giberson In the inbox this afternoon, an emailed letter from my Congressman, Randy Neugebauer, who queries me (and I guess thousands of my neighbors as well) in this manner: Notice the congressman’s question, “do you believe we should be maximizing the development of our domestic oil and gas resources?” and the button labeled “Submit … More My congressman invites me to Submit & Join*

Green energy paradox: Hotelling’s exhaustible resource and consequences of improving the alternatives

Michael Giberson The “green power paradox” grabs Hotelling by the ankles, turns him upside down, and shakes the change out of his pockets. Harold Hotelling’s classic article, “The Economics of Exhaustible Resources,” observes that the owner of an exhaustible resource stock always is making choices in the shadow of the future. If the owner produces … More Green energy paradox: Hotelling’s exhaustible resource and consequences of improving the alternatives

Was federal government support critical to the shale gas breakthrough?

Michael Giberson In the State of the Union address, President Obama invoked a little federal government research history and then jumped to the kind of logical non sequitur so common to those who see the world through politically-colored glasses: The development of natural gas will create jobs and power trucks and factories that are cleaner … More Was federal government support critical to the shale gas breakthrough?

EIA releases Annual Energy Outlook 2011

Lynne Kiesling Today the Energy Information Administration released the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook (link is to executive summary). This year’s outlook explores scenarios that include updated forecasts of shale gas production, which have changed considerably since last year’s outlook, as KP readers know due to Mike’s excellent analyses. Another aspect of the analysis that will … More EIA releases Annual Energy Outlook 2011

Same old advice gets new package

Michael Giberson My essay of advice to free-market windpower critics, originally published at Master Resource, has been re-published at AltEnergyStocks. (But the really interesting new stuff at AltEnergyStocks is the immediately prior post on how lead-carbon battery developments will challenge lithium-ion designs for uses in which lithium-ion’s low weight is not a critical factor.  So … More Same old advice gets new package

Solar power: Policies should encourage thoughtful development

Michael Giberson Tom Konrad, writing at Alternative Energy Stocks, notes that “current incentives for Solar photovoltaics are good for encouraging more solar, but they are less effective at encouraging better solar.” (Emphasis added.) His quick review of policy options touches on renewable energy credits, feed-in tariffs, net metering, time-of-use rates, carbon pricing and other tools. … More Solar power: Policies should encourage thoughtful development