Better red than dead, but not red yet (on solar power)

In her New York Times Economix column Nancy Folbre recently said (“The Red Faces of the Solar Skeptics,” March 10, 2014): If the faces of renewable energy critics are not red yet, they soon will be. For years, these critics — of solar photovoltaics in particular — have called renewable energy a boutique fantasy. A recent Wall … More Better red than dead, but not red yet (on solar power)

Solar subsidies in Italy

Michael Giberson Carlo Stagnaro, writing in the European Energy Review, finds that Italy’s generous feed-in tariffs for solar power are creating challenges for both the Italian budget and the Italian energy market. In terms of investments, Italy’s experience with solar power is definitely a success… Only Germany has more PV capacity. Indeed, Italy has more … More Solar subsidies in Italy

Making the most of Spain’s feed-in tariff for solar power

Michael Giberson Bloomberg reports on fraud via Spain’s subsidized feed in tariff rate for solar power: Preliminary evidence shows some solar stations may have run diesel-burning generators and sold the output as solar power, which earns several times more than electricity from fossil fuels, El Mundo said, citing unidentified people from the energy industry. The … More Making the most of Spain’s feed-in tariff for solar power

California adopts feed-in tariff for distributed wind and solar power systems, with Nobel Prize notes

Michael Giberson Not all of the news this week is about Nobel prize surprises. The Los Angeles Times reports that California is adopting feed-in tariffs for distributed renewable power production: Under AB 920, the state Public Utilities Commission will set a rate for utilities to compensate customers whose solar or wind systems produce more power … More California adopts feed-in tariff for distributed wind and solar power systems, with Nobel Prize notes

The unequivocal superiority of the feed-in tariffs for renewable power?

Michael Giberson At the IEEE Spectrum’s EnergyWise blog, Bill Sweet discusses one implication of current low power prices: even with generous subsidies, a potential wind or solar power plant project may not be profitable if power prices are expected to stay low. Sweet seems to believe this is a problem that requires a solution.  In … More The unequivocal superiority of the feed-in tariffs for renewable power?