A great relative risk graphic for terrorism

Lynne Kiesling In previous posts on the TSA and security here, here, here, and here, I’ve argued emphatically for taking a relative risk assessment approach to our security and surveillance policies and spending. Courtesy of Meg McLain, here’s a vivid graphic representing why that’s a good idea, and why we should not be spending so … More A great relative risk graphic for terrorism

Civil liberties and economics: more than just free markets

Lynne Kiesling I wasn’t around KP a lot last week because I was spending a lot of time following the Patriot Act extension debacle and contacting my Congressional representatives to urge them to vote against it (of my so-called representatives, only Senator Durbin did so; I think this is the first time he and I … More Civil liberties and economics: more than just free markets

Homeland security: Eroding your human rights without any benefit-cost analysis

Lynne Kiesling Over the past six months the TSA has started using whole-body imaging scanners as primary screening devices without explicit Congressional authorization. Congress has only authorized the TSA’s privacy officer to solicit public comment and publish a privacy impact statement (according to EPIC’s lawsuit), and their authorization of TSA practices is implicit in their … More Homeland security: Eroding your human rights without any benefit-cost analysis

Intrusive TSA searches create profit opportunity for Adidas

Lynne Kiesling A concise public choice analysis of the distortionary economic rents created by the ever-increasing “layers” of TSA security theater, as reported today on the Wired gadget blog: Airport “security” theater may be sickeningly pointless, but this stealthy introduction to a police state brings certain commercial advantages to those willing to cash in. First, … More Intrusive TSA searches create profit opportunity for Adidas