A Toast to Red Wine – Uh, How Many?

Michael Giberson

In a story widely reported in news and on the web – we humans like our confirmatory data – a study finds that a compound in red wine may help fight the ill effects of obesity and aging. On the front page of the Washington Post today:

A substance found in red wine protected mice from the ill effects of obesity and extended their life spans, raising the tantalizing prospect that the compound could do the same for humans and may also help people live longer, healthier lives, researchers reported yesterday.

The substance, called resveratrol, enabled mice that were fed a high-calorie, high-fat diet to live normal, active lives despite becoming obese — the first time any compound has been shown to do that.

An earlier version of the story, posted online early yesterday was later joined by this somewhat sobering correction:

An earlier version of this article did not have the correct estimate of how much wine would be necessary to get the levels of resveratrol given to mice. The researchers noted that people would have to drink hundreds of glasses of red wine a day. This version has been updated.

Uh, “hundreds of glasses of red wine a day”? Okay, maybe not quite the miracle diet we’ve been waiting for. But still, a toast to resveratrol!


4 thoughts on “A Toast to Red Wine – Uh, How Many?

  1. As I recall, chemicals which produce/induce cancers in laboratory animals at very high dosage levels over short terms are deemed to be carcinogens in humans at far lower dosages over the long term; and, either banned or severely restricted in their uses. So, logically, chemicals which produce/induce positive effects in laboratory animals at very high dosage levels over short terms would be deemed to be beneficial to humans at far lower dosages over the long term; and, encouraged. I’ll drink to that! Cabernet Sauvignon, please.

  2. D.O.U.G.,

    I’ll see you and raise you two. We’ll call it a wellness party. Maybe we should invite Lynne and Mike.

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