All the life-extending benefits of caloric restriction, without actually, you know, restricting calories?

Michael Giberson

The dramatic finish to an article in The Economist:

If inherited epigenetic changes were causing daughter rotifers to produce more catalase, it would raise the question of whether a similar thing happens in other species and, if so, whether it might be induced artificially, without all the tedious business of a lifetime’s starvation.

Maybe that makes more sense if you read the full article.

In any case, yes, a lifetime of starvation (or less dramatically, “caloric restriction”) seems like a high price to pay for extending lifespan a bit. If we can brew something up in a tea, or better yet create a syrup to pour over ice cream, I’m in favor.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “All the life-extending benefits of caloric restriction, without actually, you know, restricting calories?

  1. Calorie restriction is not how I roll.

    My candle burns at both ends
    It will not last the night;
    But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends –
    It gives a lovely light.

    “A Few Figs from Thistles” by Edna St. Vincent Millay

  2. Bear in mind the distinction between calorie restriction
    and food restriction. Years ago I traded away Twinkies for
    tomatoes and gave up soda pop completely. A major sacrifice
    to be sure but hardly starvation. As a consequence my weight,
    blood pressure, and fasting glucose all gradually improved.
    I weigh 30% less now than when I finished high school
    30 years ago. I don’t expect to live to 120, but I do expect
    to suffer less ill health than if I hadn’t made the change.

Comments are closed.