Price gouging in literature: Little House on the Prairie’s “The Long Winter”

Michael Giberson Jeremy’s Blog at LDSLiberty.org comments on a price gouging episode in The Long Winter, the sixth book in the Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder. Due to a long winter of snow and storms, the people in the town of De Smet are at the point of starving.  Suddenly … More Price gouging in literature: Little House on the Prairie’s “The Long Winter”

Nutrition experience, research, and orthodoxy, with some economics parallels

Lynne Kiesling Last week was our spring break, and I finally took some time to read Gary Taubes’ 2008 book Good Calories, Bad Calories. Taubes is an investigative science journalist who has been writing for years about the science of nutrition and epidemiology, and the book focuses on a long, careful, detailed narrative about how … More Nutrition experience, research, and orthodoxy, with some economics parallels

Book review: Mark Pennington’s Robust Political Economy

Lynne Kiesling There’s a lot of exciting work right now in political economy at the intersection of academic scholarship and application to public policy, ranging from law to public finance to regulation to development and beyond. Mark Pennington’s Robust Political Economy is one of the most exciting, thoughtful, and valuable of the recent work in … More Book review: Mark Pennington’s Robust Political Economy

A Wal-Mart long-haul truck has more intelligence in it than a typical water system

Michael Giberson At the Freakonomics blog, guest Charles Fishman explains “Why water will never be the next oil.” A sample: If you leave aside the somewhat silly world of bottled water, there has been almost no innovation in the industry of water for decades. A water facility today uses the exact same technology it did in 1973. In what … More A Wal-Mart long-haul truck has more intelligence in it than a typical water system