ADAM THIERER ON TELECOM MERGERS

Lynne Kiesling I don’t read or link to Technology Liberation Front frequently enough. I typically find that the authors there make arguments similar to ones I would make, and do so with more eloquence and expertise. Take, for example, this recent post from Adam Thierer on telecom mergers, which provides some useful analysis of why … More ADAM THIERER ON TELECOM MERGERSMore ADAM THIERER ON TELECOM MERGERS

ADAM THIERER ON TELECOM MERGERS

Lynne Kiesling I don’t read or link to Technology Liberation Front frequently enough. I typically find that the authors there make arguments similar to ones I would make, and do so with more eloquence and expertise. Take, for example, this recent post from Adam Thierer on telecom mergers, which provides some useful analysis of why … More ADAM THIERER ON TELECOM MERGERSMore ADAM THIERER ON TELECOM MERGERS

COMPOSED, ELEGANT, AND AUTHORITATIVE

Lynne Kiesling I follow in the footsteps of the super-fantastic Manolo and Ann Althouse to agree that it’s incredibly refreshing to see authoritative women like Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice dressing in a fashionable, complex, not-safe-and-blend-into-the-background manner. And as a fellow knee-high boot afficionado (and athlete), I sense a kindred spirit there … I think … More COMPOSED, ELEGANT, AND AUTHORITATIVEMore COMPOSED, ELEGANT, AND AUTHORITATIVE

HOW MUCH MORE OBVIOUS DOES RETHINKING SPECTRUM POLICY HAVE TO BE?

Lynne Kiesling Thanks to Stuart Benjamin at Volokh Conspiracy for his post on spectrum poicy, including a reference to this National Journal article on spectrum. The evidence keeps mounting that a spectrum policy that 1. is based on licensing and not ownership, 2. protects the fractured incumbency, and 3. is so clearly a political and … More HOW MUCH MORE OBVIOUS DOES RETHINKING SPECTRUM POLICY HAVE TO BE?More HOW MUCH MORE OBVIOUS DOES RETHINKING SPECTRUM POLICY HAVE TO BE?

DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE II: ORGANIC OR ORDERED COMPETITION?

Lynne Kiesling My first stab at answering the question at the end of my previous post starts with what I think is a basic claim, but one that does not get discussed much, or well, in electricity policy debates: All other things equal, organic competition outperforms ordered/managed competition in delivering long-run dynamic benefits to both … More DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE II: ORGANIC OR ORDERED COMPETITION?More DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE II: ORGANIC OR ORDERED COMPETITION?

DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE II: ORGANIC OR ORDERED COMPETITION?

Lynne Kiesling My first stab at answering the question at the end of my previous post starts with what I think is a basic claim, but one that does not get discussed much, or well, in electricity policy debates: All other things equal, organic competition outperforms ordered/managed competition in delivering long-run dynamic benefits to both … More DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE II: ORGANIC OR ORDERED COMPETITION?More DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE II: ORGANIC OR ORDERED COMPETITION?

DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE I: A CLAIM AND A QUESTION

Lynne Kiesling Those of you who read KP for commentary and analysis of electricity regulatory policy (and I thank you sincerely for doing so!) have probably noticed a relative dearth of such commentary and analysis in the past couple of months. I can’t speak for Mike, but the truth is that for my part, I … More DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE I: A CLAIM AND A QUESTIONMore DIFFICULT THINKING ABOUT INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE I: A CLAIM AND A QUESTION

OTHER NEW READS

Lynne Kiesling Here’s a placeholder link to some new (to me!) economics and technology sites, until I have time to update the links template: Division of Labour (home of my long-standing and delightful acquaintances Larry White and Deirdre McCloskey, although DM has yet to post) Market Power Economics Roundtable (not really new to me, but … More OTHER NEW READSMore OTHER NEW READS