John Asked for a Cycling Post …

Lynne Kiesling … but this is an econ post too. John Whitehead was kind to refer to our November lunch conversation in which we discovered a shared interest in cycling (to go along with our shared interests in economics, environmental economics, and beer). There are some ways that even individual recreational cycling reflects core economic … More John Asked for a Cycling Post …

The Economics of Bike Lanes

Lynne Kiesling As a celebration of impending spring, I give you economics journalist Olaf Storbeck’s sound analysis of the economics of bike lanes. His prompt for writing was a rant from John Cassidy in the New Yorker about the tradeoff between bike lanes and “free” street parking spaces. Storbeck’s analysis is thorough, and goes beyond … More The Economics of Bike Lanes

Cargo Bikes in Copenhagen

Michael Giberson I could have used a Copenhagen cargo bike (see video at linked post) last year when I occasionally carried my son’s baritone horn up to school for him. Come to think of it, I could probably still make use of a cargo bike.  Better yet, my son could make use of a cargo bike! Want more … More Cargo Bikes in Copenhagen

Roads and Paths As Common-pool Resources, and the Problem of Governing Them

Lynne Kiesling Yesterday at Reason’s Hit & Run Tim Cavanaugh wrote about something that I’ve been thinking about for a long time: the institutions we use for governing the shared use of paths between cyclists and motorists on roads, and among cyclists, walkers, runners, rollerbladers, etc. on multi-use paths. Tim’s starting point was Christopher Beam’s … More Roads and Paths As Common-pool Resources, and the Problem of Governing Them

Is Bicycling “Bad to the Bone”?

Michael Giberson Research studying competitive cyclists suggests that cycling can reduce bone density. … most recreational cyclists probably don’t need to worry too much about their bones. “The studies to date have looked primarily at racers,” [researcher Aaron] Smathers says. “That’s a very specialized demographic. These guys train for hours at a very high intensity. … More Is Bicycling “Bad to the Bone”?

My Own Private Idaho Stop Law

Michael Giberson Danny Morris at Common Tragedies explains and advocates for wider adoption of the Idaho Stop Law: The law, named after the clever state that instituted it in 1982, says that cyclists may treat stop signs as yield signs (they must stop for those w/ the right of way, but can proceed w/o stopping … More My Own Private Idaho Stop Law

About “Something Mostly Enjoyable That Also Performs a Function”

Michael Giberson From David Byrne’s review in the New York Times of Jeff Mapes book, Pedaling Revolution: [Mapes] argues that cycling promotion can raise society’s level of general fitness, since people exercise more when it seems less like exercise and more like something mostly enjoyable that also performs a function, like getting to work. “Bike … More About “Something Mostly Enjoyable That Also Performs a Function”

Bento Box on the Bike: Not What You Think

Lynne Kiesling Here’s an amusing cultural amalgamation: I am getting ready for triathlon season, and so am thumbing through the Tri Zone catalog that just appeared in my mailbox. When you do tris that are Olympic or longer, you want energy and hydration close to hand while you’re on the bike. Here’s a solution: the … More Bento Box on the Bike: Not What You ThinkMore Bento Box on the Bike: Not What You Think